Hollywood and the Military

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Hollywood and the Military

Postby drakar on Wed 30 Jun 2010 13:12

I just got back from my annual training in Minnesota and have seen some of the new advances in the training given to soldiers preparing to deploy. The principles are the same but now the effects are much more theatrical and noticable. I spent two weeks working with makeup artists, stunt doubles, and special effects crews from none other than Hollywood. In fact the effects guy on my lane had himself worked on Windtalkers, Terminator 2, and does effects for Deadwood. The IED simulators were much more advanced than the ones the army had been using and the makeup artists made causaulties very noticible from fragments of glass in cheeks etc. All I can say is that should this type of relation continue the Training will have a much more realistic feel to it and keep the deploying soldiers on thier toes and be better prepared for when they do deploy. I wish all of the 2/34 INF DIV the best of luck on their deployment to Afghanistan and am proud to have been able to take part in their training. Keep them in your prayers.
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Re: Hollywood and the Military

Postby Cralis on Wed 30 Jun 2010 14:12

Makeup?

I had a buddy in the Marine Corps that participated in the training operations for units before they deployed to Iraq. He was literally told to dig a small hole (where the IED was? who knows) and then squirted with ketchup and told to lay there and squirm.

I guess it makes it more realistic, but doesn't it take that much more time and money to do the training then? The beauty of the above was that it was pretty quick and simple...
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Re: Hollywood and the Military

Postby dazrand on Wed 30 Jun 2010 20:41

Cralis wrote: then squirted with ketchup and told to lay there and squirm.


Thank the heavens it wasn't just the Army that resorted to ketchup! :) Did lots and lots of training during my time in and never with anything more than a ketchup soaked bandage (simulated us encountering casualties on our patrol). Sounds like realism Drakar describes is a good training tool, less shock when you encounter the reality of a true casualty.
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Re: Hollywood and the Military

Postby drakar on Thu 08 Jul 2010 17:51

Actually our lanes setup time was less than half an hour in the morning to set up the make up artist and get the equipment inventoried and ready to go and then in between rotations through the day the interval period was no more than 15 minutes. Money cost was a lot higher but in the instance to reduce shock and add realism for mainly green troops the money was well invested.
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Re: Hollywood and the Military

Postby Cralis on Thu 08 Jul 2010 18:15

Meh, must just be a difference in training or something. Marines have a far far lower rate of shock or freezing up during combat. It isn't the first casualty that gets a person, it is attitude and expectations. If you were to freeze up or go nuts your Gunny would kill you before the enemy does.

Well ok, he wouldn't kill you. By God though, you'll wish he had.
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Re: Hollywood and the Military

Postby drakar on Thu 08 Jul 2010 18:18

Thing is though at the training most of the guys in these units, including many of the senior NCO's, had never seen a deployment. Those that had were in a league of their own and said that for their new guys it helped them out significantly but the new IED simulators were a vast improvement over the previous ones. These sims made sure that no one could say that it hadn't hit their vehicle and reduced visibility and even made enough noise to send everyone nears ears to ringing.
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Re: Hollywood and the Military

Postby Cralis on Thu 08 Jul 2010 23:12

Oh yeah, that I can agree with. The slap of rounds hitting around you, the crack of shrapnel and rounds flying near your head, and the ringing BANG of an explosion are some things that just need to be experienced before you can properly train yourself to deal with them...during and after.
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