Food for thought

News about space exploration and scientific advancements. What do you find interesting?

Moderators: SDS Owner, SDS Members

Forum rules
The forum is intended only for space and science information. Discussions about how it applies to Starfire is encouraged - there might be some great ideas we can use!

1. Nothing obscene.
2. No advertising or spamming.
3. No personal information. Mostly aimed at the posting of OTHER people's information.
4. No flame wars. We encourage debate, but it becomes a flame when insults fly and tempers flare.

Food for thought

Postby Kumakunshu on Sat 25 Jan 2020 12:26

Ran across this little snippet and thought some of you might fined it interesting.

https://getpocket.com/explore/item/forget-earth-like-we-ll-first-find-aliens-on-eyeball-planets?utm_source=pocket-newtab
Kumakunshu
Midshipman 1st Class
Midshipman 1st Class
 
Posts: 12
Joined: Thu 12 Jul 2018 16:54

Re: Food for thought

Postby Vandervecken on Mon 27 Jan 2020 02:19

Yes, gonna be a interesting decade for advances if life exploration; both in this system and for signs in other systems. Thanks for the share !
I weary of the chasssse. Wait for me. I will be mercccciful and quick.
User avatar
Vandervecken
Fleet Admiral
Fleet Admiral
 
Posts: 1247
Joined: Sun 29 Jan 2012 20:21
Location: Minnesnowta

Re: Food for thought

Postby Cralis on Tue 28 Jan 2020 01:02

I actually was thinking about posting that... they keep changing the name of these terminator-habitable planets for one. We don't even know for sure if they can actually exist like they are speculating.

The only new concept for me was how this would affect a world with a lot of water. I hadn't considered if a world had a lot of water and became tidelocked, how would it affect it? If it's too close, the water will boil away. If it's too far away, it will ice over. But my bigger question would be "how did it get all that water in the first place?" Unless it collected a lot of water and then spiraled inward, I'd really wonder if it could have collected enough water to overcome the tide-locked hot side when forming.

Those questions aside, it would be interesting to see a world where the water was hot on the star-facing side, habitable around the edges before becoming ice. Especially because there's a real possibility that deep undersea volcanism will cause heating from below, potentially making the water warm enough under the ice.

It will be interesting to see if there are many terminator-habitable worlds. Once we can detect them...
Image
User avatar
Cralis
SDS Member
SDS Member
 
Posts: 11326
Joined: Tue 30 Jun 2009 19:27
Location: Oregon, USA

Re: Food for thought

Postby voidstalker[woe] on Tue 28 Jan 2020 11:28

I wonder how the air currents/weather patterns would take shape on such a world. Hot air rises, and that around the ring easily moves to the dark side and cools off, but what about the hot air near to 'pupil of the eye'? How does that migrate to the dark side? Would the upper atmosphere be moving away from the sun side, while the lower/cooler air (down near the surface) be constantly blowing from the dark side toward the sunside? Or would we still see something like 'trade winds' in effect even without a fast rotation?
User avatar
voidstalker[woe]
Lieutenant Commander
Lieutenant Commander
 
Posts: 95
Joined: Wed 02 Jan 2019 17:28
Location: Ann Arbor, Michigan

Re: Food for thought

Postby Cralis on Tue 28 Jan 2020 15:07

I’m guessing that the air on the hot side rises, pulling air from the cold side. Thinking about it, I wonder if the terminator would be windy and constantly have storms.
Image
User avatar
Cralis
SDS Member
SDS Member
 
Posts: 11326
Joined: Tue 30 Jun 2009 19:27
Location: Oregon, USA

Re: Food for thought

Postby krenshala on Mon 24 Feb 2020 22:18

Honestly, the concept makes me thing of the "hurricanes" (for lack of a better name) mentioned in Ringworld Engineers (if I'm remembering which book it was correctly). Instead of coriolis having the winds rotate parallel with the surface, it would be rolling as if it was a wheel on the surface, and the hollow "eye" through the storm would be parallel (instead of the perpendicular we are used to seeing).
-- krenshala
None survive the harvest!

Yeah, I'm finally back (again)! Sometimes, life (and 13yo son's) don't leave you time to play SF and earn a paycheck. :/

No, really! Matt actually made me an admin here!
krenshala
SDS Member
SDS Member
 
Posts: 2798
Joined: Thu 02 Jul 2009 17:13
Location: Austin TX, NorAm, Sol III

Re: Food for thought

Postby Whitecold on Thu 05 Mar 2020 06:45

Cralis wrote:I’m guessing that the air on the hot side rises, pulling air from the cold side. Thinking about it, I wonder if the terminator would be windy and constantly have storms.

https://www.eso.org/public/unitedkingdo ... /eso1629g/
I found these temperature simulations for Proxima B, which while probably not habitable due to radiation trouble, the temperature gradient does not seem excessive compared to what we have between arctic and the equator.
Similar planets (without a freaking flare star to sterilize the surface) could be quite hospitable candidates.
Whitecold
Vice Admiral
Vice Admiral
 
Posts: 562
Joined: Fri 19 Sep 2014 15:03


Return to Space and Science

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 66 guests